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Marine Science

Coral Reefs at Risk of Dissolving: Study

© Alexstar / Adobe Stock

Coral reefs could start to dissolve before 2100 as man-made climate change drives acidification of the oceans, scientists said on Thursday.   Acidification will threaten sediments that are building blocks for reefs. Corals already face risks from ocean temperatures, pollution and overfishing.   “Coral

Digitalisation of Ports is Fourth Industrial Revolution

PEMA AGM delegates. Photo: PEMA

 The digitalisation of ports and terminal operations offers ways to realise a “fourth industrial revolution”, bringing with it safety, operational, and environmental benefits, delegates heard at the Port Equipment Manufacturers Association (PEMA) annual general meeting, which was held in the Spanish port city of Bilbao.

Waste-to-Chemistry Project Comes up in Rotterdam Port

Photo: Port of Rotterdam Authority

 A consortium of companies comprising Air Liquide, AkzoNobel Specialty Chemicals, Enerkem and the Port of Rotterdam Authority has signed a development agreement for the initial investments in an advanced waste-to-chemistry plant in Rotterdam.    The aim is that this will be the first plant of this

NYK Partners with KOSEN

Tadaaki Naito, President, NYK Photo: NYK Line

 Nippon Yusen Kabushiki Kaisha (NYK) and the National Institute of Technology (KOSEN) agreed to collaborate in the fields of education and public relations for the purpose of human resources development in the maritime industry and the promotion of maritime affairs awareness.   NYK has a number of

Wave Buoy Measurements on a Hexapod

(Photo: MARIN)

MARIN has recently expanded its facilities with a hexapod. This system can be used to generate forced oscillations in six degrees of freedom, either on a standalone basis or under the carriage of one of our basins. It is a useful tool to assess the efficiency of anti-roll tanks, sloshing in liquefied natural gas (LNG) tanks,

Big Canada Projects Will Have to do More to Protect Fish

© Bill Perry / Adobe Stock

Proponents of industrial projects situated near or on bodies of water in Canada will in future have to do more to protect fish and their habitat, the Liberal government said on Tuesday.   The announcement by Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc is part of an official drive to revamp the way projects

Sanchi Oil Spill Puts Coral Reefs at Risk

Sanchi oil spill modeling - February 2018 (Image: NOC)

The list on environmental concerns continues to grow in the aftermath of the Sanchi tanker tragedy.   Iranian tanker Sanchi sank in January after colliding with another vessel in the East China Sea, killing all 32 crew aboard and raising concerns about damage to the marine ecosystem. Multiple oil slicks were reported to have come from the ship,

China Plans First Lab on Ocean Oil Spill Cleaning

© Michal / Adobe Stock

China's Ministry of Transport is planning to establish a laboratory specialising in treating oil spills at sea, the first of its kind in the country, local media Science and Technology Daily reported on Sunday.   China is spending some 200 million yuan a year on researches for emergency treatment

Coral Reefs Get Sick from Plastic Waste -Study

© Richard Whitcombe / Adobe Stock

Billions of bits of plastic waste are entangled in corals and sickening reefs from Thailand to Australia's Great Barrier Reef, scientists said on Thursday.   The trash is another pressure on corals, already suffering from over-fishing, rising temperatures caused by climate change and other pollution.

Canada Ramps up Its Fight against Great Lakes’ Asian Carp

Karina Gould, Minister for Democratic Institutions, on behalf of Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announces new funding for the fight against Asian carps. (Photo: Fisheries and Oceans Canada)

Canada’s government has committed up to $20 million over five years, and ongoing, for Asian carp prevention efforts in the Great Lakes.   Asian carps are among the top aquatic invasive species being monitored for their potential establishment in the Great Lakes. Already established in the Mississippi River basin in the U.

NOAA Boots Up Its New Supercomputers

The new, powerful Dell hums alongside NOAA's IBM and Cray computers at a data center in Orlando, Fla. The three systems combined in Florida and Virginia give NOAA 8.4 petaflops of total processing speed and pave the way for improved weather models and forecasts. (Photo: NOAA)

U.S. weather models are about to become more accurate and efficient thanks to faster supercomputers and more storage.   The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said the two Dell systems added to its IBMs and Crays at data centers in Reston, Va., and Orlando, Fla. elevate its combined

Minimizing the Transfer of Invasive Aquatic Species

Photo: UK P&I Club

 Shipowners should take action to reduce the impact of invasive aquatic species (IAS) carried by hull biofouling. The UK P&I Club has published its top tips on how to reduce biofouling on board vessels to achieve greater efficiency and reduce environmental risk.   According to Madlene Wangrau, UK

TechSurge: Advancing Oil Spill Research

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Walter Shinn)

The Marine Technology Society (MTS) and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) are collaborating on an upcoming TechSurge event in New Orleans on February 5, 2018 that will focus on the effects of oil spills on the environment and public health. Recent investigations have yielded research results

Ancient Sharks Likely More Diverse Than Previously Thought

University of Chicago biologist Michael I. Coates (Credit: University of Chicago)

Sharks have a reputation as ravenous hunters and apex predators, but new analysis of fossil records shows that some of the earliest sharks might have been filter feeders, taking in water through their mouths and catching food particles – think less great white and more anchovy, another filter feeder.

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