rss icon Subscribe
desktop mobile

The Apprentice School Approved as Higher Education Institution

The century-old Apprentice School was certified to operate as a postsecondary, degree-granting institution by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV). Photo by Matt Hildreth/HII

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced that The Apprentice School at its Newport News Shipbuilding division has been approved by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia to operate as a postsecondary institution. The certification gives the school the authority to grant academic degrees, further enhancing its national reputation as the model apprenticeship program.

The school plans to grant associates of applied science degrees in maritime technology in 26 disciplines, including maintenance electrician, marine designer, nuclear test technician and modeling and simulation program analyst. Final approval of the degree programs by the Council of Occupational Education is expected to be made later this year.

"This is an historic milestone for The Apprentice School," said Xavier Beale, Newport News Shipbuilding's vice president of trades. "Our ability to offer academic degrees deepens our commitment to workforce development and will open new opportunities for our company to help to meet the ever-growing demand for skilled workers in our region."

The Apprentice School affords apprentices the opportunity to earn academic degrees through its existing partnerships with institutions of higher education. The new certification now gives the school the ability to grant and confer degrees on its own.

The approval to operate as a degree-granting institution comes after an extensive yearlong process that took into consideration the program's impact on state and regional economies, as well as students' success. It also comes after The Apprentice School established its first certificate program in 2019, awarding maritime studies certificates to apprentices who successfully complete the World Class Shipbuilding Curriculum.

The Apprentice School offers four- to eight-year, tuition-free apprenticeships in 19 trades and nine optional advanced programs. Apprentices work a 40-hour week and are paid for all work, including time spent in academic classes. Through partnerships with Thomas Nelson Community College, Tidewater Community College and Old Dominion University, The Apprentice School's academic program provides the opportunity to earn associate degrees in business administration, engineering and engineering technology and bachelor's degrees in mechanical or electrical engineering.

Jul 26, 2020

 

Shipbuilding

Chengxi Shipyard Delivers Self-unloader to CL-Hartmann JV

(Photo: CSL Group)

The first of two CSL-Hartmann joint venture ships built at Chengxi Shipyard in China was delivered

Op/Ed: AI Simplifies Maritime's Digital Transformation

© metamorworks / Adobe Stock

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is already being applied in both ship and yacht building by a number

Cheoy Lee Delivers First of Two New Tugs for Yiu Lian Dockyards

Hai Kun (Photo: Robert Allan Ltd.)

The first tug of a two vessel contract, Hai Kun, built by Cheoy Lee Shipyards, was delivered to

Education/Training

Training Tips for Ships #15: Using Student Exam Results to Measure OUR Performance

© cartoonresource/AdobeStock

Exams are a staple of training. We know what they are, we know what they are for, and we know how

Leadership Development in the Merchant Marine: The Growing Significance for the Future

© Coloures-Pic/AdobeStock

How many times have you heard someone say, “Oh, that person is a born leader; I could never do

Sea Machines Bringing Marine Autonomy to the Classroom

MMA cadet Mary Shea commands a Sea Machines autonomous vessel (Photo: Sea Machines Robotics)

Boston-based Sea Machines Robotics, a developer of autonomous command and control systems for

Maritime Apps