rss icon Subscribe
desktop mobile

New UK Center for Maritime Innovation

Logo: MarRI-UK

Press Release

A consortium of British companies, academia and government formally established a new national center for maritime innovation and technology (MarRI-UK). The center, offering development opportunities for the UK's $45B maritime sector, is based at the University of Strathclyde, with hubs to be announced across the UK. The center will provide a collaborative innovation vehicle to jointly tackle innovation and technology challenges.

The first area of collaborative focus is Clean Maritime.

MarRI-UK will focus on research and innovation within mid TRL (3 - 7) levels to address the opportunities between "discovery and research" and "commercialization" of maritime technologies and systems. It will develop a structured, coherent, and comprehensive approach leading to national and regional development and economic growth.

A maritime sector strengthened by MarRI-UK will help the co-ordination of research across the maritime sector by giving an understanding of commercial opportunities aligned to a shared roadmap. This will underpin government initiatives and investment and support the wider prosperity agenda linked to innovation.

Eight maritime companies (Babcock, BAE Systems, BMT Group, Cammell Laird, Lloyd's Register, QinetiQ, Rolls-Royce and Shell),supported by the Society of Maritime Industries, and four universities (Newcastle, Southampton, Strathclyde and UCL) have been working to develop MarRI-UK since 2013. Led by Patrick Carnie of Babcock Marine and Technology and Professor Alex Duffy of the University of Strathclyde, the consortium have worked collaboratively with Maritime UK to attain support and secure funding from the UK Government through different streams.

Jul 11, 2019

 

Technology

Shipping Industry Goes Digital in Lockdown

(Photo: DP World)

The coronavirus lockdown has accelerated a digitalization drive in a global shipping and logistics

Tech Talk: Algorithm Aims to Assist Ocean Search and Rescue

A new MIT-developed search-and-rescue algorithm identifies hidden “traps” in ocean waters. The method may help quickly identify regions where objects — and missing people — may have converged. Image courtesy of the researchers/http://news.mit.edu/

Search & Rescue algorithm identify hidden “traps” in ocean waters, helping to more quickly

LADAR: Laser Sensor Technology for the Maritime Industry

Using a blue-green laser, LADAR penetrates the ocean water mass enabling detection of submerged objects and debris, like containers, fishing nets, small barges, humans, ice floes, oil spills in the water column, plastic and much more (Photo: LADAR Ltd)

Research scientist and entrepreneur Sverre Dokken believes laser-based remote sensing has big

Environmental

Lubrizol Joins Shipping’s Zero Emissions Ambition

(Photo: The Lubrizol Corporation)

The Lubrizol Corporation says it has become the first lubricant additive technology supplier to

Shipping Plan Would Reel International Emissions into EU Carbon Market

© STOCKSTUDIO / Adobe Stock

The European Union's carbon market could capture a large chunk of emissions from outside Europe if

Forecasters Expect Busy 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season

(Photo: NOAA)

U.S. forecasters expect an above-normal 13-19 named storms during the 2020 Atlantic hurricane

Maritime Apps