rss icon Subscribe
desktop mobile

TECH FIRST: 3D Printed Pipe Fitting for Nuclear Aircraft Carrier

Don Hamadyk, Newport News Shipbuilding's director of research and development, presented the first 3-D printed metal part to Rear Adm. Lorin Selby, Naval Sea Systems Command’s chief engineer and deputy commander for ship design, integration, and naval engineering during a brief ceremony on USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Photo by Matt Hildreth/HII.

MarineLink.com

Newport News Shipbuilding Division Delivers First 3-D Metal Part For Installation On Nuclear-Powered Aircraft Carrier

Huntington Ingalls Industries' (NYSE:HII) Newport News Shipbuilding division achieved a milestone in the integration of additive manufacturing into the design and fabrication of components for nuclear-powered warships. The company has delivered the first 3-D-printed metal part to the U.S. Navy for installation on an aircraft carrier.

In a ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk the part was presented to Rear Adm. Lorin Selby, Naval Sea Systems Command's chief engineer and deputy commander for ship design, integration, and naval engineering. The part-a piping assembly-will be installed on the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and evaluated for a one-year period.

"We are pleased to have worked so closely with our Navy partners to get to the point where the first 3-D metal part will be installed on an aircraft carrier," said Charles Southall, Newport News' vice president of engineering and design. "The advancement of additive manufacturing will help revolutionize naval engineering and shipbuilding."

Last year NAVSEAapproved the technical standards for 3-D printing after extensive collaboration with the company and industry partners that involved the rigorous printing of test parts and materials, extensive development of an engineered test program, and publishing of the results.

Jan 29, 2019

 

Shipbuilding

Columbia Class Subs Take Shape in Virginia

A plasma-burning machine cuts the first steel plate that will be used to build the ballistic missile submarine Columbia (SSBN 826). Photo by Matt Hildreth/HII

A plasma-burning machine cut the first steel plate that will be used to build Columbia (SSBN 826)

Shipowners See Increase in IMO-Compliant Fuels, But Doubts Persist

Shipowners, who are facing one of the biggest changes in the oil industry in decades, are seeing more fuels that will be compliant with new rules on sulphur emissions from ships

IZMIR Shipyard Eyes S. Korean Market

Logo: Izmir Shipyard

Izmir Shipyard and ONO Group, a company in thermoplastics processing in South Korea

Navy

Columbia Class Subs Take Shape in Virginia

A plasma-burning machine cut the first steel plate that will be used to build Columbia (SSBN 826), the lead ballistic missile submarine. As Newport News continues its digital

Navy: $2.3B Deal for 12 Mine Hunting Ships

Photo:@BNR

The Belgium Naval & Robotics consortium, composed of Naval Group and ECA Group, won the contract

USN Ship sails in Disputed South China Sea

SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 7, 2019) An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the "Easyriders" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 37, Detachment 1, picks up pallets from the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Guadalupe (T-AO 200) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88). Preble is deployed to the U.S 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo

The U.S. military said one of its warships sailed near the disputed Scarborough Shoal claimed by

Maritime Apps